It’s not a secret that Arctic is a very severe place. There are no trees, cereals can’t grow here. It’s impossible to survive by gathering or agriculturing. Arctic is not a place for human being. The only way to survive here is fishing and hunting everything you can find. So inuits from Greenland and Canada hunt and fish for living.

Hunting is not just a part of inuit life – it’s a core of their culture, basis of their self-identity. Every man is a hunter. Inuits hunt literally everything they can – seals, whales, polar bears, caribou, musk ox, birds etc. Their hunting techniques are unique and very interesting, so let’s leave this topic for the next article.

Whales are hunted by inuits during summertime.

When man kills the animal, he takes everything – meat for food, fat for lamps, skin for clothes, kayaks and houses, tendons for making ropes, colon as the waterproof material etc. Many people consider hunting as unethical and blame hunters, especially when it’s all about hunting rare and beautiful animals. But what about hunting if there is no other way to survive? I don’t blame people who hunt for living, if there is no other way to survive.

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Humpback diving away from our boat scared by engine sound.

This kind of traditional hunting takes place nowaday in the most remote northern regions of Greenland and Canadian Arctic.

However, the lifestyle of the most inuit people changed dramatically in XX-XXI centuries. Denmark and Canada pays benefts to them, and hunting is not essential for living anymore. The availability of technologies, especially firearms and motorized boats, has lead to the depletion of the Greenland coast.

Take a look at this poster. This one I bought in Tasiilaq during our trip to Greenland. This poster shows the whale species you can meet there. Is that true that you can meet so many species here? So why didn’t Greenland became a whale-lovers capital o the world?

Yes, it is possible to meet different whale species here. But there is not so many whales – you can see much more in other places. The second thing is the whales are extremely shy here and they dive immediately when they hear the sound of engine – the sound of death for the whales. We didn’t seen one single seal or caribou, but what we have seen was shops where you can buy narwhal’s horn, polar bear’s claws and other cute souvenirs.

Tooth of killer whale in the local shop. Tasiilaq, Greenland.

What is the meaning of hunting for the most inuint nowadays? The possibility to kill animal for selling it’s parts to the tourists? For example, would you like to buy a toy seal covered with the real seal fur? Does hunting remains being a core of inuit culture, or is it just a way to get some additional money? Could you count killing narwhal by riffle as the traditional hunting? I don’t have the answers. What’s your opinion?

Hall of our hotel in Tasiilaq. On the right from bear’s skin you can see narwhal’s horn.

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